Three Reasons to Care about Disc Golf Research

By Josh Woods ~

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One of the questions you learn to answer in graduate school is, “Who cares?”

As you work through your research ideas, your teachers drum this question into you. For instance, after presenting your thesis proposal, someone in the audience might chirp: “Your project sounds interesting, but I’m not sure it passes the who-cares test.”

That’s as close as it gets to smack talk in academia.

As devilish as the question may be, it’s almost always worth answering. After all, if your research isn’t relevant to anyone, why carry it out? Continue reading “Three Reasons to Care about Disc Golf Research”

2018 PDGA Women’s Global Event

By Valarie Jenkins ~

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Players in the West Virginia Cup at the Seth Burton Memorial (SBM) course in Fairmont, WV. The NCWV Women’s Disc Golf Club will help organize West Virginia’s first PDGA Women’s Global Event at SBM on May 12. Photo by Jesse Wright.

Every other year sparks fly as women from all over the world meet up and play two rounds of disc golf.

The PDGA Women’s Global Event is a series of satellite tournaments hosted in several different countries. The fourth edition of the event will be played on May 12, 2018. Continue reading “2018 PDGA Women’s Global Event”

Egg Shells, Explosions and Disc Golf

By James McDonald ~

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What do you do when “that player” ends up on your card? McDonald offers straight talk on courtesy violations and strategies for dealing with them. Photos: Jesse Wright.

Throughout my 9-year career as an amateur disc golfer, I have experienced a wide variety of personalities in recreational and organized play. I would say 98 percent of the folks I meet on the tournament circuit are great people. The other 2 percent are nice folks off the field but haven’t learned to “cage the tiger.” Continue reading “Egg Shells, Explosions and Disc Golf”

Disc golf club runs 228 weekly league events in a row

By Josh Woods, photos by Jesse Wright ~

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Participants of the Morgantown Mountain Goats’ league event on New Year’s Eve, 2017. The club has not cancelled a weekly event since being established on August 12, 2013.

Disc golf clubs are like unclassified plants. No one knows what they are, but still they sprout up and spread through the hills, fields and forests, bringing delight to anyone who finds them.

In summer 2013, one disc golf club, the Morgantown Mountain Goats of West Virginia, held their first meeting in the future president’s living room. The Goat founders appointed a Board of Directors, which included Shelby Dering, Shane Leiggi, Greg Hackett and Jason Lee, and started planning the future. Their initial priorities were to establish a formal league and further develop a disc golf course at Dorsey’s Knob Park in Morgantown, West Virginia. Continue reading “Disc golf club runs 228 weekly league events in a row”

To love a loveless thing

By Josh Woods ~

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Mid-December sunrise over Dorsey’s Knob Park, Morgantown, WV. Photo by Jesse Wright.

Loving something that few people know or care about is not such a big problem. But when you love a loveless thing enough to play it and talk about it, without end—well, now you have a problem.

Your troubles can emerge almost anywhere, and before you know it, they multiply. The moment you utter the word “disc golf” in mixed company, clouds form overhead, the earth cracks, and winged monkeys appear on the horizon. Continue reading “To love a loveless thing”

In the News, June 16-30, 2017

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Grow-the-sport news from around the country: new course developments in five states; Fairmont, WV donates $1,000 to disc golf tournament; Kankakee league does promotional video; Rifle Camp Park controversy continues; certified forester says disc golf is eco-friendly; disc golf helps wounded soldiers.   Continue reading “In the News, June 16-30, 2017”

“Beauty at low temperatures is beauty” – Joseph Brodsky

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“How happy is the blameless vestal’s lot! The world forgetting, by the world forgot.” ― Alexander Pope

The hills of West Virginia are always nice to look at. In summer, these geologic wonders are attractive in a way that needs no explanation.

But in winter, when the temperature drops, and a thin blanket of snow covers the land, and the horizon fades into whiteness, and the wind dies down, and large, octangular clumps of crystallized water drift in the air like drunken moths, the hills of West Virginia are beautiful in a way that demands further clarification. Continue reading ““Beauty at low temperatures is beauty” – Joseph Brodsky”